Experts anticipate an unusual La Niña pattern

A wintery ocean scene
Spread the love

This winter will bring an unusual event characterized by Live Science as a “Rare ‘triple-dip’ La Niña.”

La Niña generally appears in the South Pacific every three to five years, cooling the ocean surface temperatures. For the southwestern United States that rely on Colorado River water, this event translates into drought due to low snowpack.

It is expected that a La Niña event will happen this winter, marking the third year in a row that it has occurred. Zoe Gillett, a researcher at the Australia Research Council Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes, told Live Science that this has “only happened twice since 1950,” cautioning that “climatologists likely won’t know which way the winds will blow until September.”

 

Deborah

Since 1995, Deborah has owned and operated LegalTech LLC with a focus on water rights. Before moving to Arizona in 1986, she worked as a quality control analyst for Honeywell and in commercial real estate, both in Texas. She learned about Arizona's water rights from the late and great attorney Michael Brophy of Ryley, Carlock & Applewhite. Her side interests are writing (and reading), Wordpress programming and much more.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Recent Posts

0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x